FAQs

Q?

What are my payment options at H.O Tires?

A.

We take cash, credit card and have financing options available.  Please call us at +1 559 513 4940 for the best option for you.

Q?

Do you carry other wheels or tires not listed on your web site?

A.

All the rims and tires that is on our website is what we at H.O. Tires has to offer.

Q?

Can I buy an odd number of wheels

A.

Odd and even numbers of wheels are offered just select the quantity when you order your new rims.

Q?

Why was my Credit card declined

A.

For your protection and security, we run each credit card order through an authorization process before any amount is charged to the card to prevent unauthorized purchases. Sometimes a credit card may be declined due to various reasons. Credit cards are sometimes declined because the customer's information doesn't match what the credit card company has on file. This is often due to a simple clerical error or mistyping. If your card has been declined during the online checkout process, you will receive error message asking you to correct any errors or call Customer Service. You may need to contact your credit card company for more specific details on why your card was declined.

Q?

How do you read tire sizes?

A.

Tire Type - The letter "P" at the beginning of the "Tire Size" tells us the tire is a P-Metric tire, referring to tires made to certain standards within the United States, intended for Passenger vehicles.
If a tire size has no letters at the beginning, this indicates a Euro metric tire. P-Metric and Euro-Metric tires may have different load capacities. The letters "LT," either at the beginning or at the end of the tire size indicate the tire was designed for light trucks. Vehicle manufacturers equip some light trucks with "LT" type tires. These tires generally require higher inflation pressures than passenger tires.
Tire Width - Is the width of the tire measured in millimeters from sidewall to sidewall. The first three-digit number in the tire size refers to the tire width. For instance, in a size P215/65 R15 tire, the width is 215 millimeters.

Aspect Ratio - Is the ratio of the height of the tire's cross-section to its width. The two-digit number after the slash mark in a tire size is the aspect ratio. For example, in a size P215/65 R15 tire, the 65 means that the height is equal to 65% of the tire's width. The bigger the aspect ratio, the bigger the tire's sidewall will be.

Construction - The letter "R" in a tire size stands for Radial, which means the layers run radially across the tire.

Wheel Diameter - Is the size of the wheel measured from one end to the other. It tells us the size of the wheel that the tire is intended to fit. A size P215/65 R15 tire is made for a wheel with a 15" diameter.
Load Index - indicates the maximum load that the tire can support when properly inflated. You'll also find the maximum load on the tire sidewall, in both pounds and kilograms.

Speed Rating - Tells you the maximum speed capability of a tire. Often speed ratings are matched to the top speed capability of the vehicle. For example, a tire with an H-speed rating has a maximum speed capability of 130 mph or 210 km/h.
DOT Symbol - The letters "DOT" on the sidewall indicate that the tire complies with all applicable Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards in the United States. Tire Identification Number - The series of letters and numbers following the letters "DOT." The TIN consists of up to 12 numbers and letters to identify the factory location and the week and year the tire was manufactured.
UTQG - Stands for Uniform Tire Quality Grading, a rating system developed by the U.S. Department of Transportation to provide consumers with information to help them purchase tires based on their relative treadwear, traction and temperature capabilities.
Traction grades indicate the wet traction of a tire under a controlled test. A tire with an "AA" rating offers outstanding traction in wet conditions.

Traction Grades
AA
A
B
C

Temperature grades indicate the ability of the tire to withstand and dissipate destructive heat. A tire with a higher temperature grade is able to operate at higher speeds.

Temperature Grades Speeds in mph
A Over 115
B Between 100 and 115
C Between 85 and 100

Treadwear grades are based on standardized government tests to help predict the expected treadwear of a tire. For example, a tire with a treadwear grade of 200 should last twice as long as a tire with a treadwear grade of 100.

Q?

How does the tread on tires work?

A.

There are multiple types of tread patterns. Here are the features and benefits of each type:

  • Directional (unidirectional)
    Directional tire tread features a large V-shaped pattern with large spaces or grooves between the tread blocks. The grooves improve hydroplaning resistance at high speeds by siphoning water more efficiently through the tread making these tires ideal for performance and ultra-high performance applications. Tires with directional tread are designed to roll in one direction and have an arrow on the sidewall of the tire that shows which way the tires should roll. They are meant to be rotated front-to-back (and vice versa) but not side-to-side because of the directional design. Vehicles equipped with different size tires on the front and rear (staggered), prohibit the ability to rotate directional tires unless they are remounted.
  • Symmetrical
    Symmetrical tire tread has the same pattern – continuous grooves and/or independent lugs – across the whole tire. This type of tire is the most common and found on most non-high-performance passenger cars because it is typically quiet and long-lasting. Also, they can be rotated in many different ways, which helps to prolong the life of the tires and makes them more versatile.
  • Asymmetrical
    Asymmetrical tire tread, most commonly found on sports cars, is a bit of hybrid in that it combines a variety of tread patterns for maximum grip on both wet and dry roads. Usually, the inside and middle parts of the tire will be designed for wet and/or winter traction, while the outside of the tire will have large tread blocks for maximum cornering capability on dry surfaces. To ensure that the tires are positioned correctly on the car (to maximize handling capabilities), the sidewalls are marked “outside only” and “inside only.” Many different rotation patterns can be used for tires with asymmetrical tread patterns.
  • Directional/Asymmetrical
    Directional/asymmetrical tire tread is the best of both worlds – it features the V-shaped pattern of the directional tread for discharging water away from the tire and the dry weather traction of the asymmetrical tread. You should follow the same rules as directional tires when it comes to rotation patterns. Vehicles equipped with different size tires on the front and rear (staggered), prohibit the ability to rotate directional/asymmetrical tires unless they are remounted.

Q?

What does tire traction rating mean?

A.

Traction grades represent the tire's ability to stop on wet pavement as measured under controlled conditions on asphalt and concrete test surfaces. As of 1997, the traction grades from highest to lowest are "AA","A","B" and "C". ... The grades do not take into consideration the cornering or turning performance of a tire.

Q?

Do you ship your product?

A.

We ship within the U.S. and Mexico, contact us directly for shipping charges.  It will vary depending upon size, weight and location the rims or tires are being shipped to.